Toxic Philanthropy Part Three: The Silicon Valley Community Foundation

I spent quite a few hours over winter break exploring various aspects of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation’s (SVCF) operations and have prepared a series of posts documenting what I have found thus far. This series is intended to provide context for my previous research on Pay for Success pilot programs being rolled out in … Continue reading “Toxic Philanthropy Part Three: The Silicon Valley Community Foundation”

Toxic Philanthropy Part 2: Hewlett Packard Re-Engineers the Social Sector

Hewlett Packard: The Tech Titan Few Education Activists Talk About Increasingly people are casting a wary eye in the direction of Silicon Valley, concerned about the power its billionaires wield over public education and society generally. While Gates, Zuckerberg, Hastings and Bezos have grabbed much of the spotlight, there is another tech influencer with a … Continue reading “Toxic Philanthropy Part 2: Hewlett Packard Re-Engineers the Social Sector”

Toxic Philanthropy Part 1: Surveillance

We are living through desperate times: populations dislocated by climate catastrophe and dispossessed by state violence. Many are attempting, unsuccessfully, to navigate economic systems grounded in low-wage, disposable labor and insurmountable debt. The cost of living continues to rise, especially in cities where wealth is concentrated in the hands of speculative investors. Stable housing is … Continue reading “Toxic Philanthropy Part 1: Surveillance”

Philanthropy’s lesser known weapons: PRIs, MRIs and DAFs

Silicon Valley Community Foundation, Part Three Here for introduction and parts one, two, four, and five. Last year, the 800+ community foundations in the United States held a combined total of over $91 billion in assets and awarded $8.3 billion in grants. As non-profits are incorporated into the “evidence-based” impact agenda, it is important to keep … Continue reading “Philanthropy’s lesser known weapons: PRIs, MRIs and DAFs”

Digital curriculum, an answer to equity? An Open Letter to Dr. Ibram X. Kendi

I was prompted to write this after watching the closing keynote address Dr. Ibram X. Kendi gave at UnboundEd’s July 2019 Standards Institute conference. A video of his lecture, “An Argument Between Racist and Anti-Racist Ideas, can be viewed here. Dr. Kendi is a professor of history and international relations at American University. He received … Continue reading “Digital curriculum, an answer to equity? An Open Letter to Dr. Ibram X. Kendi”

Casey, Aspen, United Way & The Two-Generation Con

In a previous post, When We’re The Packages, I discussed the role the Annie E. Casey Foundation (UPS $) played in developing the field of human capital impact investing. One infrastructure element developed and promoted by the foundation is data collection across multiple-generations. Their two-generation approach expands opportunities to profit from impoverished families, because the … Continue reading “Casey, Aspen, United Way & The Two-Generation Con”

Hewlett Packard And The Pitfalls Of “Deeper Learning” In An Internet Of Things World

It was time to say good-bye to the chinstrap penguin. The paper mache model had kept watch over a corner of my sewing room for years, but with our child moving on to college and evidence of flour-beetles impossible to ignore, its time had come. It was an endearing second-grade project, now a decade old. … Continue reading “Hewlett Packard And The Pitfalls Of “Deeper Learning” In An Internet Of Things World”

Pay for Success Finance Preys Upon The Poor: Presentation at Left Forum 6/29/19

I have the exciting opportunity to participate in a panel discussion with members of the Poor People’s Economic Human Rights Campaign at the Left Forum Conference coming up this weekend June 28-30 in Brooklyn, New York at Long Island University. The focus of our two-hour workshop will be building a Poor People’s Army. Here is … Continue reading “Pay for Success Finance Preys Upon The Poor: Presentation at Left Forum 6/29/19”

Alice & Automated Poverty Management

At the end of my previous post I introduced Alice.si, an Ethereum Blockchain software platform investors developed to automate payments to “charitable” projects that prove “measurable impact.” The platform employs a “pay for results” structure, an approach adopted by numerous governments including ones in the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada and Australia. After years … Continue reading “Alice & Automated Poverty Management”

What About Alice? The United Way, Collective Impact & Libertarian “Charity”

It seems the United Way is planning for a future inhabited by a mass underclass of precarious labor. In fact, this “future” may already be here, it’s just not evenly distributed as the quote attributed to William Gibson suggests. For the past few years United Way chapters nationwide have been mobilizing awareness campaigns around ALICE. The … Continue reading “What About Alice? The United Way, Collective Impact & Libertarian “Charity””